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How to Write Your Own Story, Part 5 of 5

We made it! Part 5 of our series on writing your own story. How are you doing getting yours written down?

5.

Patience. 

It took so much time for Lost & Found to be published, and I was terribly confused at times because I was absolutely sure that this was what God wanted me to write. In the beginning, there was interest by a publishing house but that fell through and I even lost what had been a once-enthusiastic agent. Really, God? What happened to that still, small voice I was so sure I had heard, urging me to write this story and communicate the passion I had to see others free from the trap of religious pursuit?

I had to be reminded, quite literally, that even though I couldn't see what was going on behind the scenes, and even though I could not see where this was all eventually going to go, I needed to keep going. God communicated this to me through friends who didn't even know why they were telling me to keep going, just that they knew they should.

In this time of waiting, of learning to be patient, work. Edit. Rewrite. Think about your reach and ministry opportunities. Tell your story to those who will listen.

And dare I say it? Build a platform. I don't love that word or even that concept because it feels very much like you have to be somebody and you have to put yourself out there, but in a way, you do. You aren’t writing this book so that no one will read it. You need to have a way that people can hear your story - that’s what the platform is for.

Rest. Write. Pray. Pursue. Repeat.


Other Posts in This Series:

Part One: You have one audience.

Part Two: What God is laying on your heart is the most important thing to write.

Part Three: Grab every moment you can.

Part Four: Write down everything you remember.


Begin to build your own Write Your Own Story notebook with free printables to help you as you get started.


How to Write Your Own Story, Part 4 of 5

How are you doing, my writing friend? Have you been able to make some headway on your own story this week? 

We're 4 points into a 5-point series, and I'm hoping it's been just enough fuel to get your fire burning. I can't wait to hear about what you are writing!

4.

Write down everything you remember.

Use whatever platform suits you best: Evernote, a bullet journal, recording things you recall into your phone, 3x5 cards, etc.

Write down or record all facts, details, place names, medical information, and people's names. Memories are fuzzy, and you may recall something at the most inopportune moment. We actually have a waterproof writing pad and pencil in our shower! No kidding.

Just a gentle caution: Be careful about whose story you’re telling. When our stories involve our kids or other family members, tread lightly. There comes a point at which teenagers' stories become their own, and it's wise to ask them how they feel about what you're writing. Maybe it's too soon. Tell your story and let the rest be told by the person whose story it is.

As I was writing Lost & Found: Losing Religion, Finding Grace, I had no desire to throw anyone under the bus, and my goal was to be gracious toward those involved in our story. I wrote about specific situations in general terms, changing descriptions of people and places so that no one else could decipher who exactly I was talking about. Grace, lots of grace poured out over that because grace wins hearts and mends relationships. Over all, this goes back to my passion mentioned in part two: seeing fellow believers find freedom in Jesus!


Other Posts in This Series:

Part One: You have one audience.

Part Two: What God is laying on your heart is the most important thing to write.

Part Three: Grab every moment you can.


Begin to build your own Write Your Own Story notebook with free printables to help you as you get started.


How to Write Your Own Story, Part 3 of 5

Welcome back! 

In part one of How to Write Your Own Story, we talked about who our audience is. In part two, we discussed passion. Now on to part three!

3.

Grab every moment you can.

You are an author. Do you believe it? Until you consider yourself a professional — whether or not you make money doing this job — you won't carve out the time to write what you know needs to be written.

It was difficult for me to call myself an author, even after a decade of blogging that brought me some side income. I wasn't writing for money and always had ministry as the goal, and somehow in my mind, that limited the legitimacy of what I was doing. Once I started to call myself an author, I could give myself permission to work on the projects I had bobbing around in my head,

So what will you require, author? A quiet house? A retreat? A half hour while waiting for your kids in their piano lessons, a coffee shop with earbuds in? What about a laptop? A stash of favorite pens? Graph paper? 

Whenever you can and whatever you need, grab it. You are a legitimate author with a story to tell, an audience of the highest importance, and a passion to put it on paper!


Other Posts in This Series:

Part One: You have one audience.

Part Two: What God is laying on your heart is the most important thing to write.


Begin to build your own Write Your Own Story notebook with free printables to help you as you get started.